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Segregated Schooling Updates in Hungary

19 June 2007

According to report of the Roma Press Center (RSK) a 10 January 2007, non-Romani students that have been commuting to the foundation school established in the Hungarian town of Jaszladany will apparently stop commuting to the foundation school and attend the local municipally- run school. RSK reported that the municipal school currently hosts 376 students while the foundational school has 205 students, approximately 70 of whom commute daily.

In 2001, the municipal government established the foundation school in order to segregate Romani students, who could not afford tuition fees of the private school (for background information, see: www.errc.org). 

In other news, according to RSK, the first three of numerous lawsuits on the wrongful classification of Romani students as mentally disabled began in January 2007. European MEP Viktoria Mohacsi, together with the non-governmental organisations Romani Civil Rights Foundation and Amalipe, instigated the lawsuits, which claim that the schools implicated wrongfully identified Romani children as mentally disabled and placed them in schools for disabled children.

According to RSK, Ms Mohacsi is asking that the number of Romani children classified as mentally disabled be reduced, estimating that over 20 percent of Romani children are classified as mentally disabled: almost 10 times more than what experts reportedly say the proportion of mentally disabled children within the general population should be.

(Roma Press Center)

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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