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Simon König

20 September 2016

Simon König was born in Vienna, Austria. He attended BG Tulln, secondary school, specialising in natural sciences. He speaks German, English and Spanish. After graduating in spring 2016, he started his 10-month internship at the European Roma Rights Center as part of the Austrian Holocaust Memorial service programme. Starting his internship in September, he came here instead of serving the military or doing a social service in Austria.

“Perhaps it sounds really corny, but it is very important to me to enhance the lives of discriminated peoples.”

In addition to that Simon is able to improve his language skills and almost a year spent abroad is certainly the best life-experience you can get, considering that he just finished school. Obviously he is looking forward to spending 10 months working at the ERRC, contributing to Roma Rights and fighting discrimination.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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