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Time of the Skinheads: Denial and Exclusion of Roma in Slovakia

2 January 1997

Time of the Skinheads: Denial and Exclusion of Roma in Slovakia

This report provides an overview of human rights violations against Roma in Slovakia during the years 1993-1996, a period in which the state itself came into existence and began to act as sole competent authority on the territory of the former Czechoslovak Federal Republic. Although several reports on Roma in Slovakia have been published domestically during this period, the primary focus of these reports has been cultural issues, while human rights concerns remained secondary or were left unaddressed. The intention of this report is to bring the picture of the human rights situation of Roma in Slovakia up-to-date. The ERRC noted three trends dominating the problematic relations between the Slovak state and Roma. In the first place, competent authorities often deny that the rights of Roma have been violated, even if there is convincing evidence that violations have indeed taken place. Secondly, there are presently exclusionary legal, administrative and social practices which prevent Roma from joining the mainstream of Slovak society and keep them marginalized. Finally, there are long-term historical patterns, daily consciously or unconsciously reenacted, whereby the Slovak state intervenes as caretaker state, effectively demoralizing Roma through paternalism and pressure toward a kind of neutralized conformity. Time of the Skinheads addresses each of these themes.

Time of the Skinheads: Denial and Exclusion of Roma in Slovakia  

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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