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Balogh v Hungary

20 July 2004

Facts: A Hungarian citizen of Romani origin was interrogated by police regarding fuel vouchers he had allegedly stolen. The applicant alleged that during the interrogation, the officers repeatedly slapped him across the face and ear and punched him on the shoulder. His left ear drum was seriously damaged and his working capacity reduced due to his impaired hearing. Criminal proceedings were discontinued on the grounds that it was impossible to determine when the injuries had been inflicted.

Art. 3 (right to be free from inhumane treatment): violation

The Court found that the injury suffered by the applicant was sufficiently serious and declared that "where an individual is taken into police custody in good health but is found to be injured at the time of release, it is incumbent on the State to provide a plausible explanation of how those injuries were caused." The court held that the, authorities failed to provide a plausible explanation for the cause of the applicant's injury.

The full text of the decision is available HERE.

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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