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Natasha Lamoreux

12 November 2013

Natasha Lamoreux was born in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. She completed dual BA degrees from Metropolitan State University in Denver, Colorado, in Spanish and Women’s Studies, Political Science, and Nonprofit Organizational Management. Natasha is a graduate of New York University's Center for Global Affairs (CGA) where she earned an MSc in Human Rights, with focus on women's human rights and human security, gender equality, and empowerment and engagement of women within marginalized communities.

Natasha served as a Human Rights Education Intern with ERRC during the summer of 2011, while researching her Master’s thesis on the Romani Women’s Movement in Eastern Europe. Natasha has contributed to various publications, sites and programs on topics related to women, including engaging women in transnational security, implementing UN Security Council Resolution 1325, gender and civic education in MENA (Middle East and North Africa), girls education in Afghanistan and gender and women’s rights in the transnational Roma Rights movement.  She currently serves as the Senior Program Officer for Online Learning with the Women’s Learning Partnership (WLP) in Bethesda, MD, USA, where she draws on her experience managing capacity building, organizational and human rights education programs, as well as creating and facilitating and participating in online learning experiences. Natasha remains deeply committed to the issues of Roma Rights, and aspires to return to the field. Natasha currently resides in Washington, D.C.
 

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ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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