Support the ERRC

The European Roma Rights Centre depends upon the generosity of individual donors for its continued existence. Please join in enabling our future with a contribution. Gifts of all sizes are welcome and are accepted via Paypal or bank transfers, according to the information below.

To donate via Paypal (external website; payments processed in Hungarian forints (HUF). To calculate exchange rates: http://www.xe.com/ucc/)

To donate via bank transfer, send your contribution to: 

Account holder: European Roma Rights Centre
Bank name: Budapest Bank, Lipótvárosi Fiók 
Bank address: 1054 Budapest, Báthori u. 1., Hungary
USD IBAN: HU21-10103173-40268600-00000998
EURO IBAN: HU54-10103173-40268600-00000307
SWIFT code: BUDAHUHB

And submit the information below to:

Julianna Oros, Financial Officer 
European Roma Rights Centre
Wesselényi utca 16
H-1077 Budapest
Hungary

Email: julianna.oros@errc.org
Fax: +36 1 413 2201

Last Name:________________________________________ 

First Name:________________________________________  

Address:__________________________________________   

City:_____________________________________________ 

Country:__________________________________________ 

Tel:______________________________________________

Email:____________________________________________ 

Size and currency of donation: ________________________ 

Your donation will be acknowledged with an official letter.

Thank you for supporting our efforts.

ERRC submission to UN HRC on Hungary (February 2018)

14 February 2018

Written Comments of the European Roma Rights Centre concerning Hungary to the UN Human Rights Committee for consideration at its 122nd session (12 Narch - 6 April 2018).

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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