Social Charter

The European Social Charter includes a protocol that enables the European Committee of Social Rights to review collective complaints on rights violations. The ERRC has been one of the principal organisations to use this procedure. Its first collective complaint was submitted in 2003 in a case against Greece concerning the right of Roma to adequate housing. The ERRC has successfully continued to file complaints regarding housing, health, social assistance and social protection to the Committee.

Visit the website of the European Social Charter for information and case law.

  • ERRC v Bulgaria, Collective Complaint 151/2017 (discrimination, reproductive health care)
  • ERRC v Ireland, Collective Complaint 100/2013 (discrimination, housing)
  • ERRC v Portugal, Collective Complaint 61/2010 (discrimination, housing, social protection)
  • ERRC v France, Collective Complaint 51/2008 (discrimination, housing, social protection)
  • ERRC v Bulgaria, Collective Complaint 48/2008 (discrimination, social assistance)
  • ERRC v Bulgaria, Collective Complaint 46/2007 (discrimination, health care)
  • ERRC v Bulgaria, Collective Complaint 31/2005 (discrimination, housing)
  • ERRC v Italy, Collective Complaint 27/2004 (discrimination, housing)
  • ERRC v Greece, Collective Complaint 15/2003 (discrimination, housing)



ERRC v Bulgaria, Collective Complaint 151/2017

24 November 2017


We teamed up with the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee (BHC) to expose racial segregation and abuse of Romani women in maternity wards in Bulgaria. BHC’s research, which features in our complaint, shows that in various hospitals across the country Romani women giving birth are placed in separate maternity wards from non-Roma women. These segregated wards are in bad condition and the women giving birth in them are exposed to abuse by hospital personnel, who use racist insults and sometimes physically abuse them.

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The Fragility of Professional Competence: A Preliminary Account of Child Protection Practice with Romani and Traveller Children in England

24 January 2018

Romani and Traveller children in England are much more likely to be taken into state care than the majority population, and the numbers are rising. Between 2009 and 2016 the number of Irish Travellers in care has risen by 400% and the number of Romani children has risen 933%. The increases are not consistent with national trends, and when compared to population data, suggest that Romani and Traveller children living in the UK could be 3 times more likely be taken into public care than any other child. 

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Families Divided: Romani and Egyptian Children in Albanian Institutions

21 November 2017

There’s a high percentage of Romani and Egyptian children in children’s homes in Albania – a disproportionate number. These children are often put into institutions because of poverty, and then find it impossible ever to return to their families. Because of centuries of discrimination Roma and Egyptians in Albania are less likely to live in adequate housing, less likely to be employed and more likely to feel the effects of extreme poverty.

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